<img height="1" width="1" style="display:none" src="https://www.facebook.com/tr?id=1529661517359828&amp;ev=PageView&amp;noscript=1"> 4 of the Best Trees for Containers on Your Atlanta Landscape | HighGrove Partners

Versatile containers are a convenient, creative way to include more color, provide additional shade and add a touch of artistic class to your Atlanta landscape. Large containers offer a big, open canvas for planting possibilities—and we’re talking trees. Think tall, vibrant, blooming, textural, ever-changing. Need suggestions?

Here are four of the best trees for containers on your Atlanta property. All of these selections thrive in our Zone 7 region.

Crepe Myrtle

Crepe Myrtle growing in Atlanta SuburbsGrow It: Sometimes referred to as the pride of the South, hardy crepe myrtle (Lagerstroemia indica) will grow 8 to 10 feet tall, providing shade and interest from its scaly-smooth bark and flowers in pinks, reds and purples. It will grow a single trunk, or branch out into multiple trunks. Dwarf varieties like ‘New Orleans’ or ‘Pocomoke’ grow up to 3 feet tall when mature if you’re looking for a crepe myrtle with a shorter stature.

Maintain It: An established crepe myrtle is relatively drought-tolerant, though keep in mind that container growing requires diligent watering since soil can dry out more quickly than the ground. Regular fertilization will promote healthy growth.

Japanese Maple

japanese maple growing in atlantaGrow It: These statement trees are slow-growing and available in a range of varieties. Some grow umbrella-like canopies and others branch up and out. You’ll find an assortment of colors that vary from greens to autumnal reds—we especially like the crimson hue as an attention-grabber in the landscape.

Maintain It: Dwarf cultivars are ideal for containers, though if you choose a larger plant be sure to prune annually to maintain an appropriate size and shape for container growing. A word on drainage: Japanese maples do not like overly wet soil. So be sure the container can adequately drain excess water.

Camellia

CamelliaGrow It: These year-round lookers are slow to grow but reach 6 to 12 feet. Their glossy, green leaves and blooming flowers in a full palette of colors will brighten up any large container on your Atlanta property. If you’ve got deer that like to munch on your landscape after-hours, they won’t be likely to touch camellia.

Maintain It: Give camellia partial shade—so position these containers in areas where they won’t be exposed to hot, Atlanta afternoon sun. (Try northern views when first establishing camellia.) As they develop more leaves they become more versatile in terms of sun exposure.

You can prune camellia when it is not blooming, and you’ll want to do this regularly to “make room” for flowers. If you notice bud drop, you might be watering too much or not enough.

Heavenly Bamboo

Heavenly Bamboo is perfect for containersGrow It: While not technically bamboo, this Nandina domestica evergreen shrub produces clusters of white flowers that bloom in spring and summer. In fall, it bears red berries and foliage shifts to an eye-catching crimson. The constant evolution of colors, flowers and berries will create an ongoing show on your Atlanta property, and proper pruning will position heavenly bamboo well for large containers.

Maintain It: For the most intense foliage color, position containers with heavenly bamboo in full sun. Protect the plant from harsh wind and keep soil moist at all times.

As for pruning, you can remove up to one-third of the canes in spring.

Caring For Containers

Containers can be designed like miniature landscapes, but what we must remember is there is limited soil depth. Without proper watering practices, plant health will suffer. A full-service commercial landscape maintenance firm can provide a watering program for containers so you can protect your investment in container trees and other plantings.

Let’s talk about selecting the best trees for the large containers on your Atlanta property and how to care for them. 

Call us at 678-298-0550, or fill out this simple contact form.

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Last modified: August 5, 2016