<img height="1" width="1" style="display:none" src="https://www.facebook.com/tr?id=1529661517359828&amp;ev=PageView&amp;noscript=1"> How To Attract (And Keep) Effective HOA Board Members? | HighGrove Partners

Atlanta neighborhoods run by effective HOA boards will clearly stand out.Drive through several Atlanta neighborhoods, and the ones run by effective HOA boards will clearly stand out.

These communities will be the ones with visible signage, maintained landscapes, well-lit common areas and seasonal color.

But getting to that level takes time and the right people, making your search for HOA board members even more important.

Finding a willing, dedicated person who will benefit your homeowners association board is a tall order. And once you find them, you don’t want them to leave and have to go through the entire process all over again.

Keep your HOA board from becoming a revolving door with these five tips.

Know Who Would Be a Good Member

Not everyone is cut out to be an HOA board member. But it’s your job to spot the ones who are.

While you may have volunteers, that’s often not the case. Luckily, there are a few traits of people who might be a good fit:

  • Regularly attend neighborhood meetings and events
  • Present solutions to issues in the community
  • Are well liked throughout the neighborhood

Approach these community-minded people to see if they’d be interested in joining the HOA board. They obviously care about where they live, so you just need to give them a better idea of what the board does and its benefits.

Be Ready for Excuses

"I'm too busy" is a common excuse by homeowners not interested in serving on their HOA board. Even the most dedicated people in your community may give you excuses for why they shouldn’t be on the board — although they might not all be valid.

When it comes to HOA board responsibilties, here are some common excuses and how to respond:

I’m too busy.

Who hasn’t used this excuse before? The truth is you’re only too busy for things that you don’t make a priority. Since time is such a precious commodity, it’s no surprise they want to make the most of it.

Give them an idea of how much time meetings and other tasks take. Is it a few hours a week? That’s just the length of a movie, and I’m sure they could make time for that. Make the board a way for them to give back — not just more work.

I don’t have the right experience.

No one goes to school to become an HOA board member. Let them know others on the board will explain everything they need to know. All that is required is that they care about the neighborhood.

I’m not interested in the drama.

Yes, there will be times when the board has heated discussions. That’s true for any group of people passionate about something. But, drama and politics is definitely not something the board strives toward. You could have them sit in on a meeting to get a better idea of what to expect.

Show the HOA Values Board Members

Employees and volunteers who feel valued by their employer are 60 percent more likely to say they feel motivated to do their best.

The old adage that you catch more flies with honey can apply to your HOA’s recruiting process. You need to show these potential members there are plenty of good aspects of the job if they join the HOA board — including how much they will be valued.

Here’s something to think about: Employees who feel valued by their employer are 60 percent more likely to say they feel motivated to do their best for the employer, according to the Psychologically Healthy Workplace Program.

Here are a few ways you can show board members are valued:

  • Offer educational opportunities. Whether your board hosts an educational meeting or you meet with another homeowners association board, having opportunities for members to learn will help them feel more comfortable (and content) in their role.
  • Say “thanks.” It might seem too simple, but sometimes all someone wants is to feel appreciated for his or her work. So, if a member successfully resolves a homeowner complaint or finds a more-qualified vendor, recognize them or write them a thank you note.
  • Have fun. Throw dinner parties or socials throughout the year to get to know the members on a more personal level. Work can be fun.

Telling potential board members about this upfront will give them a more favorable view of the position.

Help New Members Avoid Obstacles

The more problems a new board member faces, the more likely they are to get frustrated — and possibly quit. To keep that from happening, let them in on some board insight and what they should steer clear of early on.

Here are four things new recruits should avoid:

  • Not understanding their role (and its limitations)
  • Trying to take on too much too soon
  • Not putting in the time to learn how the association works
  • Hiring a new vendor without doing any homework on them (or knowing what the association actually needs)

You can also ask other board members what they wished they had known before they started to give newbies even more insight.

Make the HOA Board Members’ Jobs Easier

At HighGrove Partners, we’ve been working with HOA board members for years and know how important it is for everything to run smoothly. And that’s where our expertise comes in.

Our qualified team can maintain, enhance and renovate your HOA property — giving you one less thing to worry about.

That means no more homeowners complaining about streetlights being out or unruly plant beds because all of that will be covered with our commercial landscaping services.

Call us at 678-298-0550, or request a free estimate online for you HOA.

 

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Images: Home illustration, Busy, Thank you

Last modified: July 7, 2016